Commit 6bde912a authored by catch's avatar catch

Issue #859970 by jn2, sun, rfay: Cleanup form_api() () docs.

parent 72656c79
......@@ -76,7 +76,7 @@
* workflow, see the
* @link http://api.drupal.org/api/drupal/developer--topics--forms_api_reference.html Form API reference @endlink
* and the
* @link http://drupal.org/node/37775 Form API section of the handbook. @endlink
* @link http://drupal.org/node/37775 Form API documentation section. @endlink
* In addition, there is a set of Form API tutorials in
* @link form_example_tutorial.inc the Form Example Tutorial @endlink which
* provide basics all the way up through multistep forms.
......@@ -86,73 +86,7 @@
* passed by reference to most functions, so they use it to communicate with
* the form system and each other.
*
* The $form_state keys are:
* - build_info: Do not change; internal information stored by Form API to be
* able to build and rebuild the form:
* - args: A list of arguments used to rebuild the form from cache.
* - files: A list of include files to be loaded to rebuild the form. See
* form_load_include().
* - 'values': An associative array of values submitted to the form. The
* validation functions and submit functions use this array for nearly all
* their decision making. (Note that
* @link http://api.drupal.org/api/drupal/developer--topics--forms_api_reference.html/7#tree #tree @endlink
* determines whether the values are a flat array or an array whose structure
* parallels the $form array.)
* - 'rebuild': If the submit function sets $form_state['rebuild'] to TRUE,
* submission is not completed and instead the form is rebuilt using any
* information that the submit function has made available to the form builder
* function via $form_state. This is commonly used for wizard-style
* multi-step forms, add-more buttons, and the like. For further information
* see drupal_build_form().
* - 'redirect': $form_state['redirect'] is used to redirect the form on
* submission. It may either be a string containing the destination URL, or
* an array of arguments compatible with drupal_goto(). See
* drupal_redirect_form() for complete information.
* - 'storage': $form_state['storage'] is not a special key, and no specific
* support is provided for it in the Form API, but by tradition it was
* the location where application-specific data was stored for communication
* between the submit, validation, and form builder functions, especially
* in a multi-step-style form. Form implementations may use any key(s) within
* $form_state (other than the keys listed here and other reserved ones used
* by Form API internals) for this kind of storage. The recommended way to
* ensure that the chosen key doesn't conflict with ones used by the Form API
* or other modules is to use the module name as the key name or a prefix for
* the key name. For example, the Node module uses $form_state['node'] in node
* editing forms to store information about the node being edited, and this
* information stays available across successive clicks of the "Preview"
* button as well as when the "Save" button is finally clicked.
* - 'temporary': Since values for all non-reserved keys in $form_state persist
* throughout a multistep form sequence, the Form API provides the 'temporary'
* key for modules to use for communicating information across form-related
* functions during a single page request only. There is no use-case for this
* functionality in core.
* - 'triggering_element': (read-only) The form element that triggered
* submission. This is the same as the deprecated
* $form_state['clicked_button']. It is the element that caused submission,
* which may or may not be a button (in the case of Ajax forms.) This is
* often used to distinguish between various buttons in a submit handler,
* and is also used in Ajax handlers.
* - 'cache': The typical form workflow involves two page requests. During the
* first page request, a form is built and returned for the user to fill in.
* Then the user fills the form in and submits it, triggering a second page
* request in which the form must be built and processed. By default, $form
* and $form_state are built from scratch during each of these page requests.
* In some special use-cases, it is necessary or desired to persist the $form
* and $form_state variables from the initial page request to the one that
* processes the submission. A form builder function can set 'cache' to TRUE
* to do this. One example where this is needed is to handle Ajax submissions,
* so ajax_process_form() sets this for all forms that include an element with
* a #ajax property. (In Ajax, the handler has no way to build the form
* itself, so must rely on the cached version created on each page load, so
* it's a classic example of this use case.) Note that the persistence of
* $form and $form_state across successive submissions of a multi-step form
* happens automatically regardless of the value for 'cache'.
* - 'input': The array of values as they were submitted by the user. These are
* raw and unvalidated, so should not be used without a thorough understanding
* of security implications. In almost all cases, code should use the data in
* the 'values' array exclusively. The most common use of this key is for
* multi-step forms that need to clear some of the user input when setting
* 'rebuild'.
* See drupal_build_form() for documentation of $form_state keys.
*/
/**
......@@ -211,22 +145,25 @@ function drupal_get_form($form_id) {
* persist across page requests when the 'cache' or 'rebuild' flag is set.
* The following parameters may be set in $form_state to affect how the form
* is rendered:
* - build_info: A keyed array of build information that is necessary to
* rebuild the form from cache when the original context may no longer be
* available:
* - args: An array of arguments to pass to the form builder.
* - build_info: Internal. An associative array of information stored by Form
* API that is necessary to build and rebuild the form from cache when the
* original context may no longer be available:
* - args: A list of arguments to pass to the form constructor.
* - files: An optional array defining include files that need to be loaded
* for building the form. Each array entry may be the path to a file or
* another array containing values for the parameters 'type', 'module' and
* 'name' as needed by module_load_include(). The files listed here are
* automatically loaded by form_get_cache(). By default the current menu
* router item's 'file' definition is added, if existent.
* router item's 'file' definition is added, if any. Use
* form_load_include() to add include files from a form constructor.
* - rebuild_info: Internal. Similar to 'build_info', but pertaining to
* drupal_rebuild_form().
* - rebuild: Normally, after the entire form processing is completed and
* submit handlers ran, a form is considered to be done and
* submit handlers have run, a form is considered to be done and
* drupal_redirect_form() will redirect the user to a new page using a GET
* request (so a browser refresh does not re-submit the form). However, if
* 'rebuild' has been set to TRUE, then a new copy of the form is
* immediately built and sent to the browser; instead of a redirect. This is
* immediately built and sent to the browser, instead of a redirect. This is
* used for multi-step forms, such as wizards and confirmation forms.
* Normally, $form_state['rebuild'] is set by a submit handler, since it is
* usually logic within a submit handler that determines whether a form is
......@@ -234,32 +171,106 @@ function drupal_get_form($form_id) {
* set $form_state['rebuild'] to cause the form processing to bypass submit
* handlers and rebuild the form instead, even if there are no validation
* errors.
* - input: An array of input that corresponds to $_POST or $_GET, depending
* on the 'method' chosen (see below).
* - redirect: Used to redirect the form on submission. It may either be a
* string containing the destination URL, or an array of arguments
* compatible with drupal_goto(). See drupal_redirect_form() for complete
* information.
* - no_redirect: If set to TRUE the form will NOT perform a drupal_goto(),
* even if 'redirect' is set.
* - method: The HTTP form method to use for finding the input for this form.
* May be 'post' or 'get'. Defaults to 'post'. Note that 'get' method
* forms do not use form ids so are always considered to be submitted, which
* can have unexpected effects. The 'get' method should only be used on
* forms that do not change data, as that is exclusively the domain of post.
* - no_redirect: If set to TRUE the form will NOT perform a drupal_goto(),
* even if 'redirect' is set.
* forms that do not change data, as that is exclusively the domain of
* 'post.'
* - cache: If set to TRUE the original, unprocessed form structure will be
* cached, which allows to rebuild the entire form from cache.
* cached, which allows the entire form to be rebuilt from cache. A typical
* form workflow involves two page requests; first, a form is built and
* rendered for the user to fill in. Then, the user fills the form in and
* submits it, triggering a second page request in which the form must be
* built and processed. By default, $form and $form_state are built from
* scratch during each of these page requests. Often, it is necessary or
* desired to persist the $form and $form_state variables from the initial
* page request to the one that processes the submission. 'cache' can be set
* to TRUE to do this. A prominent example is an Ajax-enabled form, in which
* ajax_process_form() enables form caching for all forms that include an
* element with the #ajax property. (The Ajax handler has no way to build
* the form itself, so must rely on the cached version.) Note that the
* persistence of $form and $form_state happens automatically for
* (multi-step) forms having the 'rebuild' flag set, regardless of the value
* for 'cache'.
* - no_cache: If set to TRUE the form will NOT be cached, even if 'cache' is
* set.
* - values: An associative array of values submitted to the form. The
* validation functions and submit functions use this array for nearly all
* their decision making. (Note that
* @link http://api.drupal.org/api/drupal/developer--topics--forms_api_reference.html/7#tree #tree @endlink
* determines whether the values are a flat array or an array whose structure
* parallels the $form array.)
* - input: The array of values as they were submitted by the user. These are
* raw and unvalidated, so should not be used without a thorough
* understanding of security implications. In almost all cases, code should
* use the data in the 'values' array exclusively. The most common use of
* this key is for multi-step forms that need to clear some of the user
* input when setting 'rebuild'. The values correspond to $_POST or $_GET,
* depending on the 'method' chosen.
* - always_process: If TRUE and the method is GET, a form_id is not
* necessary. This should only be used on RESTful GET forms that do NOT
* write data, as this could lead to security issues. It is useful so that
* searches do not need to have a form_id in their query arguments to
* trigger the search.
* - must_validate: Ordinarily, a form is only validated once but there are
* - must_validate: Ordinarily, a form is only validated once, but there are
* times when a form is resubmitted internally and should be validated
* again. Setting this to TRUE will force that to happen. This is most
* likely to occur during AHAH or Ajax operations.
* likely to occur during Ajax operations.
* - programmed: If TRUE, the form was submitted programmatically, usually
* invoked via drupal_form_submit(). Defaults to FALSE.
* - process_input: Boolean flag. TRUE signifies correct form submission.
* This is always TRUE for programmed forms coming from drupal_form_submit()
* (see 'programmed' key), or if the form_id coming from the $_POST data is
* set and matches the current form_id.
* - submitted: If TRUE, the form has been submitted. Defaults to FALSE.
* - executed: If TRUE, the form was submitted and has been processed and
* executed. Defaults to FALSE.
* - triggering_element: (read-only) The form element that triggered
* submission. This is the same as the deprecated
* $form_state['clicked_button']. It is the element that caused submission,
* which may or may not be a button (in the case of Ajax forms). This key is
* often used to distinguish between various buttons in a submit handler,
* and is also used in Ajax handlers.
* - has_file_element: Internal. If TRUE, there is a file element and Form API
* will set the appropriate 'enctype' HTML attribute on the form.
* - groups: Internal. An array containing references to fieldsets to render
* them within vertical tabs.
* - storage: $form_state['storage'] is not a special key, and no specific
* support is provided for it in the Form API. By tradition it was
* the location where application-specific data was stored for communication
* between the submit, validation, and form builder functions, especially
* in a multi-step-style form. Form implementations may use any key(s)
* within $form_state (other than the keys listed here and other reserved
* ones used by Form API internals) for this kind of storage. The
* recommended way to ensure that the chosen key doesn't conflict with ones
* used by the Form API or other modules is to use the module name as the
* key name or a prefix for the key name. For example, the Node module uses
* $form_state['node'] in node editing forms to store information about the
* node being edited, and this information stays available across successive
* clicks of the "Preview" button as well as when the "Save" button is
* finally clicked.
* - buttons: A list containing copies of all submit and button elements in
* the form.
* - complete_form: A reference to the $form variable containing the complete
* form structure. #process, #after_build, #element_validate, and other
* handlers being invoked on a form element may use this reference to access
* other information in the form the element is contained in.
* - temporary: An array holding temporary data accessible during the current
* page request only. It may be used to temporary save any data that doesn't
* need to or shouldn't be cached during the whole form workflow, e.g. data
* that needs to be accessed during the current form build process only.
* page request only. All $form_state properties that are not reserved keys
* (see form_state_keys_no_cache()) persist throughout a multistep form
* sequence. Form API provides this key for modules to communicate
* information across form-related functions during a single page request.
* It may be used to temporarily save data that does not need to or should
* not be cached during the whole form workflow; e.g., data that needs to be
* accessed during the current form build process only. There is no use-case
* for this functionality in Drupal core.
* - wrapper_callback: Modules that wish to pre-populate certain forms with
* common elements, such as back/next/save buttons in multi-step form
* wizards, may define a form builder function name that returns a form
......@@ -268,8 +279,8 @@ function drupal_get_form($form_id) {
* hook_forms() or have to invoke drupal_build_form() (instead of
* drupal_get_form()) on their own in a custom menu callback to prepare
* $form_state accordingly.
* Further $form_state properties controlling the redirection behavior after
* form submission may be found in drupal_redirect_form().
* Information on how certain $form_state properties control redirection
* behavior after form submission may be found in drupal_redirect_form().
*
* @return
* The rendered form. This function may also perform a redirect and hence may
......
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