Commit 429c8a00 authored by Dries's avatar Dries

- documentation updates contributed by Michael O'Henly <michael@tenzo.com>
  and myself
parent 72e8fa57
......@@ -3,6 +3,7 @@
- online installation guidelines
* http://drop.org/module.php?mod=drupal
- drupal project page
- drupal project page if you would like to get involved in the
ongoing development
......@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ function Story($userid, $subject, $abstract, $article, $section, $timestamp) {
function story_visible($story) {
global $user;
return ($story->status == 1 && $user->id) || ($story->status == 2) || user_permission();
return ($story->status == 2) || ($story->status == 1 && $user->id) || user_permission($user);
}
?>
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
function affiliate_help() {
?>
<P>This is a small module to manage related and/or affiliate sites. The module exports 2 different blocks with links to the affiliate sites.</P>
<P>This is a small module to manage related and/or affiliate sites. The module exports two different blocks with links to the affiliate sites.</P>
<?
}
......
......@@ -10,19 +10,19 @@ function ban_help() {
?>
<P>The ban module keeps a list of bans in four categories:</P>
<UL>
<LI>E-mail bans: this type of ban specifies which email-addresses will be rejected when registering new users. Can be used to prevent users from using a free-mail account (e.g. hotmail.com).</LI>
<LI>Email bans: this type of ban specifies which email addresses will be rejected when registering new users. Can be used to prevent users from using a free email account (e.g. userid@hotmail.com).</LI>
<LI>Profanity bans: <I>under construction</I></LI>
<LI>Hostname bans: this type of ban allows you to block certain hostnames to access to your site or to register as a new user.</LI>
<LI>Hostname bans: this type of ban allows you to block certain hostnames from access to your site or from registering as a new user.</LI>
<LI>Username bans: this ban will block certain usernames from registration. Typical examples include <I>admin</I>, <I>anonymous</I>, <I>root</I>, <I>webmaster</I>, etc.</LI>
</UL>
<P>The ban system allows you to use a flexible wild-card ban system. This means you can block all email addresses from a certain domain name, block every username starting with "guest", etc. To do this, you can use the following wild-card characters:</P>
<P>The ban module allows you to use a flexible wild-card ban system. This means you can block all email addresses from a certain domain name, block every username starting with "guest", etc. To do this, use the following wild-card characters:</P>
<UL>
<LI>&nbsp;% : matches any number of characters, including zero characters.</LI>
<LI>&nbsp;_ : matches exactly one character.</LI>
</UL>
<P><U>Examples</U>:</P>
<P><U>Examples:</U></P>
<UL>
<LI>E-mail address bans <CODE>%@hotmail.com</CODE>, <CODE>%@altavista.%</CODE>, <CODE>%@usa.net</CODE>, etc. Used to prevent users from using free-email accounts, which might be used to cause trouble.</LI>
<LI>Email address bans <CODE>%@hotmail.com</CODE>, <CODE>%@altavista.%</CODE>, <CODE>%@usa.net</CODE>, etc. Used to prevent users from using free email accounts, which might be used to cause trouble.</LI>
<LI>Username bans <CODE>root</CODE>, <CODE>webmaster</CODE>, <CODE>admin%</CODE>, etc. Used to prevent administrator impersonators.</LI>
</UL>
<?
......
......@@ -6,10 +6,10 @@
function block_help() {
?>
<P>Blocks are the boxes visible in the side bars on the left and the right-hand side of the website. They are either exported by the engine or by any of the available modules. To really get your teeth in a drupal website, you are going to have to deal with blocks and administrating blocks in a fairly sophisticated fashion. This means you are going to have to be sensitive to the way the block placement strategy works.</P>
<P>The placement of blocks is delegated to the administrator but for most blocks, i.e. those called "custom blocks", the sole force behind enabling and disabling them is the user itself.</P>
<P>An administrator can lay out and arrange the available blocks to fit in two regions: "left" and "right". Regions simply contain blocks. In addition, an administrator can assign each block (within a region) a weight to sort them vertically. The heavy blocks will sink down whereas the light blocks will be positioned at the top.</P>
<P>As mentioned above, blocks can be arranged to fit in two regions: left and right. For theme builders, each region is identified by a corresponding constant: "left" and "right".</P>
<P>Blocks are the boxes visible in the side bars on the left- and right-hand side of the website. They are either exported by the engine or by any of the active modules. To really get your teeth into a drupal website, you are going to have to deal with blocks and administering blocks in a fairly sophisticated fashion. This means you will need to understand how the block placement strategy works.</P>
<P>The placement of blocks is delegated to the administrator. In most cases (i.e., the "custom" blocks), the user has complete control -- using preferences -- over whether or not they are enabled.</P>
<P>An administrator can lay out and arrange the available blocks to fit in two regions: "left" and "right". Regions simply contain blocks. In addition, an administrator can assign each block (within a region) a weight to sort them vertically. The heavier blocks will sink and the lighter blocks will be positioned nearer the top.</P>
<P>As mentioned, blocks may be arranged to fit in two regions: left and right. For theme builders, each region is identified by a corresponding constant: "left" and "right".</P>
<?
}
......
......@@ -6,10 +6,10 @@
function block_help() {
?>
<P>Blocks are the boxes visible in the side bars on the left and the right-hand side of the website. They are either exported by the engine or by any of the available modules. To really get your teeth in a drupal website, you are going to have to deal with blocks and administrating blocks in a fairly sophisticated fashion. This means you are going to have to be sensitive to the way the block placement strategy works.</P>
<P>The placement of blocks is delegated to the administrator but for most blocks, i.e. those called "custom blocks", the sole force behind enabling and disabling them is the user itself.</P>
<P>An administrator can lay out and arrange the available blocks to fit in two regions: "left" and "right". Regions simply contain blocks. In addition, an administrator can assign each block (within a region) a weight to sort them vertically. The heavy blocks will sink down whereas the light blocks will be positioned at the top.</P>
<P>As mentioned above, blocks can be arranged to fit in two regions: left and right. For theme builders, each region is identified by a corresponding constant: "left" and "right".</P>
<P>Blocks are the boxes visible in the side bars on the left- and right-hand side of the website. They are either exported by the engine or by any of the active modules. To really get your teeth into a drupal website, you are going to have to deal with blocks and administering blocks in a fairly sophisticated fashion. This means you will need to understand how the block placement strategy works.</P>
<P>The placement of blocks is delegated to the administrator. In most cases (i.e., the "custom" blocks), the user has complete control -- using preferences -- over whether or not they are enabled.</P>
<P>An administrator can lay out and arrange the available blocks to fit in two regions: "left" and "right". Regions simply contain blocks. In addition, an administrator can assign each block (within a region) a weight to sort them vertically. The heavier blocks will sink and the lighter blocks will be positioned nearer the top.</P>
<P>As mentioned, blocks may be arranged to fit in two regions: left and right. For theme builders, each region is identified by a corresponding constant: "left" and "right".</P>
<?
}
......
......@@ -7,21 +7,21 @@
function box_help() {
?>
<P>The content of the site can be almost entirely altered through boxes. Simply put, <I>boxes</I> are small bits of text, HTML or PHP code which will get plugged into the site just like any other block. Boxes are typically used to add custom blocks to the site.</P>
<P>Each box consists of a subject and an associated block of text, HTML or PHP code which can be as long as you want it to be and that will 'render' the content of the box.</P>
<P>The content of the site can be almost entirely altered through <I>boxes</I>. Simply put, boxes are small bits of text, HTML or PHP code which will get plugged into the site just like any other block. Boxes are typically used to add custom blocks to the site.</P>
<P>Each box consists of a subject and an associated block of text, HTML or PHP code that can be as long as you wish and that will 'render' the content of the box.</P>
<H3>PHP boxes</H3>
<P>If you know how to script in PHP, PHP boxes are pretty easy to create. Don't worry if you're no PHP-wizard: simply use ASCII or HTML boxes instead.</P>
<P>If you know how to script in PHP, PHP boxes are easy to create. Don't worry if you're no PHP-wizard: simply use ASCII or HTML boxes instead.</P>
<P>You can use any piece of PHP code to make up the content of a PHP box: this implies that you can declare and use functions, consult the SQL database, access configuration settings and much more. A PHP box's code is stored in the database and the engine will dynamically embed the PHP code just-in-time for execution.</P>
<P>There are however some factors to keep in mind when using and creating PHP boxes: PHP boxes can be extremely useful and flexible, yet they can be dangerous and insecure if not properly used. If you are not familiar with PHP, SQL or even with the site engine for that matter, avoid experimenting with PHP boxes because you can - and you probably will - corrupt your database or even render your site unusable! If you don't plan to do fancy stuff with boxes then you're probably better off with ASCII or HTML boxes.</P>
<P>Remember that the code within each PHP box must be valid PHP code, including things like terminating statements with a semicolon so the parser won't die. Therefore, it is highly recommended to test your boxes separately using a simple test script on top of a test database before migrating to your production environment running your real database.</P>
<P>Note that you can use global variables such as configuration parameters within the scope of a PHP box. Also keep in mind that variables that have been given values in a PHP box will retain these values in the engine or module afterwards.</P>
<P>There are however some factors to keep in mind when using and creating PHP boxes: PHP boxes can be extremely useful and flexible, yet they can be dangerous and insecure if not properly used. If you are not familiar with PHP, SQL or with the site engine, avoid experimenting with PHP boxes because you can - and probably will - corrupt your database or render your site unusable! If you don't plan to do fancy stuff with boxes then you're probably better off with ASCII or HTML boxes.</P>
<P>Remember that the code within each PHP box must be valid PHP code -- including things like correctly terminating statements with a semicolon so that the parser won't die. It is highly recommended that you develop your boxes separately using a simple test script on top of a test database before migrating to your production environment.</P>
<P>Note that you can use global variables such as configuration parameters within the scope of a PHP box. Also keep in mind that variables which have been given values in a PHP box will retain these values in the engine or module afterwards.</P>
<P>You can use the <CODE>return</CODE> statement to return the actual content for your block as well.</P>
<P><U>A basic example:</U></P>
<P>Given the box with subject "Welcome", used to create a "<I>Welcome</I>"-box. The content for this box could be created by using:</P>
<P>Given the box with subject "Welcome", used to create a "<I>Welcome</I>" box. The content for this box could be created by using:</P>
<PRE>
return "Welcome visitor, ... welcome message goes here ...";
</PRE>
<P>If we are however dealing with a registered user, we can customize the message by using:
<P>If we are however dealing with a registered user, we can customize the message by using:</P>
<PRE>
if ($user->userid) {
return "Welcome $user->userid, ... welcome message goes here ...";
......@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ function box_help() {
return "Welcome visitor, ... welcome message goes here ...";
}
</PRE>
<P>For a more in-depth example, we recommend you to check the existing boxes and to use them as a start.</P>
<P>For more in-depth examples, we recommend that you check the existing boxes and use them as a starting point.</P>
<?
}
......
......@@ -5,9 +5,9 @@
function cron_help() {
?>
<P>Cron (which stands for chronograph) is a periodic command scheduler: it executes commands at intervals specified in seconds. It can be used to control the execution of daily, weekly and monthly jobs (or anything with a period of n seconds). Automating tasks is one of the best ways to keep a system running smoothly, and if most of your administration does not require your direct involvement, cron is an ideal solution.</P>
<P>Note that cron does not guarantee that the commands will be executed at the specified interval. However, the engine will make sure that the commands are run at the specified intervals as closely as possible.</P>
<P>Check the documentation page for more information about cron and how to setup it correctly.</P>
<P>Cron (which stands for chronograph) is a periodic command scheduler: it executes commands at intervals specified in seconds. It can be used to control the execution of daily, weekly and monthly jobs (or anything with a period of <i>n</i> seconds). Automating tasks is one of the best ways to keep a system running smoothly, and if most of your administration does not require your direct involvement, cron is an ideal solution.</P>
<P>Note that cron does not guarantee the commands will be executed at the specified interval. However, the engine will make sure that the commands are run as close to the specified intervals as possible.</P>
<P>Check the documentation page for more information about cron and how to setup it correctly.</P>
<?
}
......
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......@@ -70,9 +70,9 @@ function headline_cron() {
function headline_help() {
?>
<P>Drupal's headline module both imports and exports RDF/RSS headlines.</P>
<P>A lot of news-oriented websites are now publishing news (headlines) and make their content available through XML, RSS and RDF backend files. They syndicate content for free and allow retrieval and further transmission, aggregation, or online publication. At the current state, drupal's headline module supports RDF and RSS backends.</P>
<P>RSS was originally developed by Netscape to be able to add news channels to "My Netscape" sites, but has since become adopted as the defacto standard for distributing headlines and brief descriptions of things that change around the net.</P>
<P>The headline module goes out to a list of configured news sites once an hour or so (driven from cron), downloads new RSS/RDF data and makes it available to your visitors. In addition, your headlines are exported as well and can be retrieved at http://yourdomain.com/export/headlines.rdf.</P>
<P>A lot of news-oriented websites are now publishing news (headlines) and making their content available through XML, RSS and RDF backend files. They syndicate free content and allow retrieval and further transmission, aggregation, and online publication. In its current state, drupal's headline module supports RDF and RSS backends.</P>
<P>RSS was originally developed by Netscape to allow adding news channels to "My Netscape" sites, but it has since become adopted as the <I>de facto</I> net standard for distributing headlines and brief dynamic texts.</P>
<P>The headline module goes out to a list of configured news sites once an hour or so (driven by cron), downloads new RSS/RDF data and makes it available to your visitors. In addition, your headlines are exported as well and can be retrieved by other sites from <CODE>http://yourdomain.com/export/headlines.rdf</CODE>.</P>
<?
}
......
......@@ -16,10 +16,10 @@ function story_cron() {
function story_help() {
?>
<P><B>Scheduled stories</B>: stories that are scheduled to be automatically published at a given date and time. Useful when you have to leave the site alone for a while or when you want to regulate the flow of new content.</P>
<P><B>Queued stories</B>: user-contributed stories are automatically whisked away to a submission queue for moderators to frown at it. Moderators vote whether or not a story should be carried to the front page for discussion.</P>
<P><B>Posted stories</B>: published stories accessible to all visitors.</P>
<P><B>Dumped stories</B>: rejected stories that are no longer available to visitors.</P>
<P>Scheduled stories: stories that are scheduled to be automatically published at a given date and time. Useful when you have to leave the site alone for a while or when you want to regulate the flow of new content.</P>
<P>Queued stories: user-contributed stories are automatically whisked away to a submission queue for moderators (i.e. registered user) to frown at. Moderators vote whether or not a story should be posted to the front page for discussion.</P>
<P>Posted stories: published stories accessible to all visitors.</P>
<P>Dumped stories: rejected stories that are no longer available to visitors.</P>
<?
}
......
......@@ -16,10 +16,10 @@ function story_cron() {
function story_help() {
?>
<P><B>Scheduled stories</B>: stories that are scheduled to be automatically published at a given date and time. Useful when you have to leave the site alone for a while or when you want to regulate the flow of new content.</P>
<P><B>Queued stories</B>: user-contributed stories are automatically whisked away to a submission queue for moderators to frown at it. Moderators vote whether or not a story should be carried to the front page for discussion.</P>
<P><B>Posted stories</B>: published stories accessible to all visitors.</P>
<P><B>Dumped stories</B>: rejected stories that are no longer available to visitors.</P>
<P>Scheduled stories: stories that are scheduled to be automatically published at a given date and time. Useful when you have to leave the site alone for a while or when you want to regulate the flow of new content.</P>
<P>Queued stories: user-contributed stories are automatically whisked away to a submission queue for moderators (i.e. registered user) to frown at. Moderators vote whether or not a story should be posted to the front page for discussion.</P>
<P>Posted stories: published stories accessible to all visitors.</P>
<P>Dumped stories: rejected stories that are no longer available to visitors.</P>
<?
}
......
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